Poppot Leaderboard

Farm Fresh Milk is a Better Name for Raw Milk

raw-milk

What about Fresh Milk?

By Sylvia P. Onusic, PhD

I was talking today to my friend, John McCormick, a grass farmer who lives in Wilmore, PA  about the reactions of  some few people who were attending the Lactose Intolerance Conference at NIH this past week and stopped by the Weston Price exhibit, which was manned, or should I way womaned, by Kim Hartke, publicist for the non-profit organization. One lady was angry and demanded that Kim leave because raw milk was illegal in Maryland. Kim had the approval of the National Institutes of Health Conference Management Center to be present there. The woman walked by the table the following day in a huff, and repeated her comments.

John, who started drinking about a quart of raw milk kefir daily, after three bouts of cancer, wondered why it was called raw milk. “Why don’t we just call it “fresh milk?,” he asked me. “People wouldn’t have such a bad reaction. I’m surprised no one has thought of it yet.”

Upon second thought, what he said had a great deal of truth to it.

Raw is a word that does evoke specific mental images, whether it be raw meat, or a wound, dripping blood. It is an edgy word and applying it to such a gentle natural drink bears rethinking. After all, pasteurized milk certainly cannot be termed “fresh,” after being mishandled by heating, then pulverized to break up the fat globules and adulterated with artificial Vitamin D. And the final product stands row upon row on shelves in the dairy case at supermarkets, with a long “expiration date.”

On the other hand, “fresh milk,” straight from the cow, comes to you in its natural state, with no additions or subtractions. It must be bottled immediately and sold within a few short days.

Just something to think about. Government regulators from the FDA recently harassed an Amish farmer, in Pennsylvania, entered his property and demanded an inspection for possibly producing fresh milk because,  “Well, you have cows. You cannot be consuming all the milk you produce.” They then followed a man in a truck, who was an observer to the scene, for 50 miles, after he left the farm. When the man later questioned the agents  as to why they were harassing him and demanding to inspect his  truck,  they responded,  “We have a cause, because you left the farm.”  It makes you wonder.

Why do we call it “raw milk?” The actions of the FDA in this case were definitely “raw.”

Sylvia P. Onusic, Ph.D[/caption]

Sylvia P. Onusic holds a PhD in Health Education and Nutrition. She has completed all coursework to qualify for Registered Dietician. She is also a certified nutrition teacher in Pennsylvania and has taught nutrition in local high schools and on the university level.  She is a member of the American.Society for Nutrition, PASA- Pennsylvania Sustainable Agriculture, and Weston A Price Foundation.

Sylvia will be speaking at the upcoming Raw Milk Symposium, on Raw Milk Perspectives in Europe.

This second international Raw Milk Symposium is coming up  April 10 in Wisconsin. Click on this link for more information and to register to attend.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...Paid Endorsement Disclosure: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of renumeration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

Comments

  1. Joseph Heckman says:

    I agree that “fresh milk” is a better term. Actually, when you read the older literature on milk, the word milk had the meaning of fresh milk. Unfortunately the term pasteurized milk somehow became generally known or abbreviated to just the word milk when in fact it should always be called pasteurized milk. I think this terminology has lead to confusion in health sciences where, for example, “milk” is said to cause allergies without making any distinction between fresh milk and pasteurized milk. How is it possible to correct such a language problem?

  2. thank, Joe, for your additional comments and support on this. I know that in Slovenia and other European countries it is called “fresh milk.” And most Europeans wriggle up their nose when they hear the term “Raw milk ?”

  3. Call it what ever you like, it is still illegal to sell it in about half the states. There are some powerful forces working to keep it that way. It makes me crazy. I ran a very successful Grade A Organic Raw Milk dairy in TX. The USDA inspector loved us. Our milk always tested cleaner than the big commercial dairies even though we milked by hand. People drove 4 or 5 hours to get our milk. Now I live in OH and am constantly asked for milk. Can’t do it. The long arm of the law is always watching.
    .-= Alan Roberts´s last blog ..Real Food and A Box Full of Kids =-.

  4. I think fresh milk is a good term, but raw milk is very appropriate given its uncooked condition.

    And I don’t believe changing the name of something is a good strategy most of the time. “Climate change” may be a better descriptor than “global warming” but it only raises eyebrows: “Yeah, sure. It’s freezing out here. No wonder they wanted to change the name! Harumph!” (That’s the reaction I get in discussions 9 times out of 10.)

    Calling a recession and “economic downturn” doesn’t change the number of people out of work, it’s just spin. Let’s choose our words carefully in the real food movement and not fall for spin.
    .-= Local Nourishment´s last blog ..In Season: Burdock Root =-.

  5. I like Fresh Milk or Farm Fresh Milk, but to escape the use of the term Raw Milk, I have been using the terms Clean, Natural Milk and this is what I like. However, I would rather simply drink Mjlk to set it apart from what is commonly thought of as Milk.
    .-= Augie´s last blog ..BIG NEWS: 2nd Annual International Raw Milk Symposium– Claiming Your Rights =-.

  6. Sylvia,

    This is a great idea! Most people are scared by the word “Raw”. “Fresh Milk “is a much more appealing description, and is completely accurate. In fact, pasteurized milk cannot be fresh, because it is heated.
    .-= Stanley Fishman´s last blog ..Bringing Back the Fat Cap – Restoring the Fat of the Land =-.

  7. I know terminology seems like a small thing, but I believe it makes a huge difference over time. We as a group need to play the marketing game too and make the truth be known one person at a time. Perception, unfortunately does mean something, and ‘raw milk’ may have connotations that we won’t be able to overcome. A fresh new outlook is needed to make change happen. I may live in utopia-land, but oh well! It’s fun here!
    .-= Kim @ the Nourishing Cook´s last blog ..How to Make your own Yogurt =-.

  8. Kimberly Hartke says:

    FTCLDF has downloadable banner ads now available, for you to help us promote the first ever Raw Milk Symposium in America (the first was in Toronto last year).

    Can you imagine the power and solidarity of hundreds of dairies/consumers
    running this ad on their websites or sending it out in their newsletters? The
    ads click thru to our symposium site. I just found out yesterday that I will be going! Can’t wait!

    The ads are here, please let kim dot hartke at gmail.com know if you run the ad!

    http://www.farmtoconsumerfoundation.org/rawmilksymposium/flyer/index.htm

    Kimberly Hartke
    WAPF Publicist

  9. Laura Villanti says:

    Yes, I think that Farm Fresh Milk is a much better term. I personally find that I like to use a term like fresh milk over raw milk. Very positive connotations….farm fresh milk.

  10. David C. Lowell says:

    “Fresh milk” is an interesting alternative. It’s short and accurate. The words we employ should have power. The other side fights dirty. The are also the Goliath — they have mega-industry and the government on their side. We need every bit of help we can get. Let’s choose our words carefully.

    If “raw” conjures up negative images, then how about turning the tables? Again, our words should have the power — every time they are uttered — to chip away at the mass brainwashing that has taken place. Let’s choose a name for raw milk that by comparison makes drinking supermarket milk sound like a questionable endeavor.

    If we switch from “raw” to “fresh”, the opposition will accuse us of trying to hide and downplay the “ugly, dangerous truth” that our milk hasn’t been made “safe” through pasteurization. Let’s slay them with the truth and be PROUD of the rawness. How about…

    Untreated milk — implies that supermarket milk is “treated” (think “sewage treatment facility”)

    Unadulterated milk — implies that supermarket milk is adulterated. And who wants to drink adulterated milk? It even conveniently raises the question, “How is supermarket milk adulterated?” Let’s imply that a spade is a spade. Let’s raise suspicion and doubt in the minds of the general public about the “milk” that they are drinking — simply by speaking the name of our milk.

    Unprocessed milk — implies that supermarket milk is processed, which it most certainly is. It raises the question of how supermarket milk is processed. It makes the association with “processed foods”.

    As much as it is important to make raw milk sound as good as it truly is, we need to use words that make pasteurized, homogenized, artificially fortified, pus-laden, deconstructed-reconstructed milk from sick confinement cows that never see the light of day sound as bad as it really is. After all, we have the truth on our side. John McCormick had an important insight for which we should be grateful. But let’s keep the brainstorming going! Words have power.

    (apologies that this is longer than the original blog post)

  11. David, no apologies necessary, this is really insightful! Love your ideas. I will try to use all your terminology on this blog!
    .-= Kimberly Hartke´s last blog ..Butter Can Help You Lose Weight!? =-.

  12. When I try to explain what kind of milk I drink, I like using the term “fresh milk.” I think it makes people question whether or not the milk they buy could be considered fresh, and that’s a good thing. The term ‘raw milk’ conjures images of eating raw meat.

    Calling it ‘raw milk’ is accurate, but why should we define it by its opposite? For me, the term ‘fresh milk’ is more descriptive and appropriate.
    .-= Melissa @Cellulite Investigation´s last blog ..CelluScience from GNC: Can You Really Treat Cellulite with a Pill? =-.

  13. In CA we are required by law to call our raw milk ” Grade A RAW Whole MILK”. It is not a matter of choice. So we all have had to get used to this label.

    I like Fresh Milk as well. In CA the GOT MILK? marketing people use fresh milk all the time and that milk is very very dead. The Got Milk? people also use the words Real Milk…..it is all about power and abuse of language. These same people allowed the use of SOYMILK, RICEMILK and ALMONDMILK. None of which are milk at all. This all came from the processors wanting THROUGH PUT…they do not care what they bottle as long as it goes down their line and makes a profit.

    What does this all mean??? I think it means that the dairyman has been sold out by the processors and has been pushed out of the marketing and processing decisions by his own neglect. Any time that a farmer becomes disconnected from his consumer….the end for that farmer is near.

    Pasteurization killed more than bad bugs….it killed the American dream.

    The very good news is that the American dream has been rediscovered in Clean Fresh and Delicious whole healing raw milk and farmers are fighting like crazy to reconnect back to their long lost consumers. The battle is on…!!

    Mark McAfee

    When raw milk is as miraculous as it is….we do not really care what the word Raw sounds or looks like. We just tolerate the labels and the bias with pride.

    It comes with the territory.

  14. In CA we are required by law to call our raw milk ” Grade A RAW Whole MILK”. It is not a matter of choice. So we all have had to get used to this label.

    I like Fresh Milk as well. In CA the GOT MILK? marketing people use fresh milk all the time and that milk is very very dead. The Got Milk? people also use the words Real Milk…..it is all about power and abuse of language. These same people allowed the use of SOYMILK, RICEMILK and ALMONDMILK. None of which are milk at all. This all came from the processors wanting THROUGH PUT…they do not care what they bottle as long as it goes down their line and makes a profit.

    What does this all mean??? I think it means that the dairyman has been sold out by the processors and has been pushed out of the marketing and processing decisions by his own neglect. Any time that a farmer becomes disconnected from his consumer….the end for that farmer is near.

    Pasteurization killed more than bad bugs….it killed the American dream.

    The very good news is that the American dream has been rediscovered in Clean Fresh and Delicious whole healing raw milk and farmers are fighting like crazy to reconnect back to their long lost consumers. The battle is on…!!

    Mark McAfee

    When raw milk is as miraculous as it is….we do not really care what the word Raw sounds or looks like. We just tolerate the labels and the bias with pride.

    It comes with the territory.

Trackbacks

  1. […] focus on access, choice. Instead of using the term raw milk, try these descriptors suggested by Sylvia Onusic and blog commenter, David C. Lowell: farm fresh, unprocessed, untreated, […]

Speak Your Mind

*