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Andrea Milstein’s Raspberry Rollade with Spelt Flour

red raspberries
Creative Commons License photo credit: madmoiselle lavender?

Andrea Milstein is a wife, mother, homemaker and cooking instructor in Oakton, Virginia. She is an active member of the Weston A. Price Foundation and the Northern Virginia Whole Foods Meetup group. Visit her Cooking with an Accent website. Andrea has agreed to be a regular contributor to Hartke Is Online! Please let us know in the comments if you try one of her delicious recipes!

Right when I thought I had pretty much exhausted all possibilities of using spelt, I had this flash-back to something my mother used to whip up during berry season. The batter consists of mainly eggs, separated and individually whipped, some sugar and spelt flour. The flour content is relatively low in order to make the Rollade pliable. The most trying part for the Rollade novice is the rolling and simultaneous peeling of the parchment paper.

Raspberry Rollade with Spelt Flour

Rollade:

5   eggs, separated
1tsp  vanilla
pinch of salt
3oz/85g sugar
3oz/85g spelt flour

Crème Chantilly:

1c  heavy cream
1TS  sugar
1/2tsp  vanilla extract
1TS   cognac

a good amount of berries of the season

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

In large bowl or standing mixer combine egg whites, vanilla and salt. Start beating at high speed while gradually adding sugar. Beat for 3-4 minutes or until whites form firm peaks.

In separate bowl beat egg yolks until light and fluffy, about 3 – 4 minutes. Scoop about 1/3 of beaten egg whites into egg yolk bowl and fold in with wire whisk. Transfer back into egg-white bowl and sprinkle with the flour. Use wire whisk to carefully combine eggs and flour. Make sure not to deflate batter.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper making sure the edges of the paper rise slightly higher than the rim of the pan. Cut 4 one-inch diagonal slits in the corners pointing to the center of the sheet. Tuck the slit corners of the paper over each other to make a neat pleat in each corner of the pan.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan and spread it in an even layer with a rubber spatula.

Bake for 12 – 14 minutes. When done, the cake should be nicely set and puffy. Remove the pan from the oven and allow the cake to cool to room temperature.

Whip the cream with the  sugar, vanilla and cognac to make the crème Chantilly filling. Lift the parchment to remove the cake form the pan and set it on a flat work surface.
Spread the crème Chantilly over the cake evenly and top with berries.

With the long side facing you, lift up the near edge of the cake and parchment and begin to peel the paper off the cake. Roll the cake another few inches pressing against the parchment to make a spiral and then gently peeling it off as the cake layer rolls away from you. Complete the roll keeping it just on the far edge of the parchment sheet. Cover the roll by tucking the loose parchment around the cylinder so it can be moved easily. The Rollade can now be refrigerated in the paper or transferred immediately to a platter for serving.

Before serving, sprinkle with powder sugar and say of prayer of gratitude that you just figured out how to throw together a fresh and relatively healthy cake/dessert in close to no time.

Rasperry Rollade Made with Spelt Flour

Rasperry Rollade Made with Spelt Flour

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Comments

  1. … and this is where I find myself declaring: THANK GOODNESS for flashbacks 🙂

    This looks divine.

    lo’s last blog post..Milwaukee Creole: Barbequed Shrimp

  2. Beautiful Recipe! I just wanted to comment that, despite a lot of popular press, spelt is still wheat and does contain gluten, this is important for celiacs and those with wheat allergy, like myself and my son. thanks, Sylvia Onusic, Nutrition, Phd

  3. Sounds interesting. Thanks for info .I like You Now! (sounds weird.. should say I follow you Now!.. ) 🙂

  4. Just one clarification on spelt and gluten. There is “True Spelt” and a lot of other spelts which have been bred for higher yield and contain wheat strains for that matter. True spelt with no wheat bred into it is a different animal than most spelts you come across in the US. It took me literally years to find a supplier for true spelt. If you get lucky and if you are persistent enough you might be able to find one of the few varieties of true spelt out there. Also, although glutenous the gliadin proteins of spelt are distinctly different from wheat. See if you can find “Oberkulmer” one of the few varieties of true spelt grown in the US.

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